Latest vaccine news

If you have taken part in a vaccine study or are interested in doing so, please read the statements and FAQs below.

Certification, boosters and travel

If after reading the information you still need further assistance, please contact us.

Last updated: 22 October 2021

Thank you again for your participation which continues to enable progress to be made in the development of effective vaccines against COVID-19.

The Government’s expert committee, the Joint Committee on Vaccines and Immunisations (JCVI), has now recommended some people receive a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, at least 6 months after their initial course of vaccination, to ensure that protection is maintained through the winter months. People in the priority groups for this include health and social care staff, older people and people with certain medical conditions, as in the first roll-out of vaccination.

We are aware that there has been uncertainty about the position of trial participants which we can now clarify as below. This page provides important additional information and FAQs for vaccine study participants on how they may obtain additional COVID-19 vaccines and a COVID Pass for international travel purposes, if needed.

The Government’s expert committee, the Joint Committee on Vaccines and Immunisations (JCVI), together with chief investigators of the clinical trials, have been considering the options in order to provide data-based advice on the risks, benefits, and the best approach to protect COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial participants.

In England, the new arrangements will be rolled out gradually, we would like to ask once again for your patience in being able to get appointments to discuss additional vaccines with your trial team.

We would ask that participants do not call or attend trial sites without an appointment unless they have an urgent concern. This is so that they can put arrangements in place, to support participants through this process. Letters are being sent out to COVID-19 vaccine study participants, with those who are on studies in which vaccines have been approved receiving one letter, and those who are enrolled on studies which the trial vaccine has not yet been approved, will receive another. For transparency, both letters are linked below.

Thank you for your patience as this is offered to all participants as early as possible.

Participant Letter (England): Receiving additional approved vaccine(s) after trial of not-yet approved vaccines (Novavax, Valneva, Medicago and Com-Cov2 Novavax Participants)

Dear Vaccine Trial Participant,

Receiving additional approved vaccine(s) after trial of not-yet approved vaccines

Thank you again for your participation which continues to enable progress to be made in the development of effective vaccines against COVID-19. The world owes you a debt of gratitude. 

There is an expectation that the vaccines trialled in phase 3 studies in the UK will offer strong, long-lasting protection against COVID-19, even if they have not yet been approved.

This letter provides important additional information for trial participants on booster vaccines and how they may obtain a COVID Pass for international travel purposes, if needed.

The Government’s expert committee, the Joint Committee on Vaccines and Immunisations (JCVI), together with chief investigators of the clinical trials, have been considering the options in order to provide data-based advice on the risks, benefits, and the best approach to protect COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial participants. The new arrangements apply only to England at this time. They will be rolled out gradually, we would like to ask once again for your patience in being able to get appointments to discuss additional vaccines with your trial team.

Booster vaccines and flu

COVID-19 booster doses are being rolled out to people who are in priority groups, including health and care workers, people with certain health conditions and older people, who have had their primary course at least 6 months ago. We are aware that there has been uncertainty about the position of trial participants which we can now clarify as below.

In consultation with the JCVI and the NHS, the plan agreed is:

  • Trial participants (who are not on a booster trial) can be offered a booster, in line with their priority group. 
  • If invited by the NHS, you may go ahead and  have a booster dose. On some trials, you may be offered a trial vaccine, which you opt for instead can have if you choose.
  • You should not take up a booster dose if you are on an active booster trial, such as Cov-Boost, AstraZeneca Beta Variant or Sanofi booster, or if you have already had a booster dose on your trial, unless your trial team contacts you to suggest this. 
  • You do not need a booster earlier than the rest of the population in your priority group.
  • Common side effects can be expected after additional doses, as with initial doses. These may include headache, arm pain and mild fever.
  • It is important to be aware that the need for, and safety of, additional boosters after trial vaccines has not been fully evaluated and approved by the regulators in the normal way.

Boosters for trial participants are available from certain vaccination centres only, for the time being (unless you were on a trial for a vaccine that has since been approved, in which case you can access a vaccine in the normal way from any centre when you receive your invitation). Please inform the person giving you the vaccine that you are on a trial. Vaccine centres have been informed of the government’s position on booster doses for trial participants.  Please tell the trial team when you had your booster at your next appointment.

Whether or not you have a booster COVID-19 jab, we recommend that you have your annual flu jab in line with NHS guidance.

Demonstrating a full course of approved vaccine / international travel

We recognise that many trial participants have been unable to take advantage of some of the benefits offered to people who have received a full course of approved vaccine, particularly overseas travel.

The UK government is working with international partners to ensure that trial participants are recognised. The government is continuing active conversations  with other countries, including through groups such as the G7, the EU Commission and the WHO to shape the approach taken around the world to sharing health status for travel, including vaccination status. However, there is currently no internationally agreed policy on trial participants, and we recognise each country sets their own requirements for entry, and we are aware that many do not recognise trial vaccines. 

Novavax, Valneva, Medicago and Com-Cov2 trial participants

In consultation with the JCVI, advice has been produced for participants who wish to receive additional doses of approved vaccines, on top of the trial vaccines. This will make it easier for participants to travel overseas. This advice applies to participants on the Novavax, Valneva, Medicago, and Novavax recipients on the Com-Cov2 trial only, as these are the only trials affected by the travel issue.

It is important you are aware of potential risks of having additional doses, which may be without any clinical benefits. Before having any additional doses, please be aware of the following information:

  • Safety of additional dose(s). While booster doses following the AZ and Pfizer vaccines have now been approved, there are no studies which provide data when two additional doses are given, and no studies where the new, as-yet unapproved vaccines, have been used as the primary dose with 2 additional doses. We cannot confirm the safety of one or two doses of approved vaccine on top of a full course of trial vaccine (three/four active vaccine doses in total). It is therefore important to discuss the possible risks against benefits with a doctor who is part of the team supporting the  trial you are on. You will be exposed to any possible side-effects from further vaccines. The vaccine may not offer you any greater protection against COVID-19.

  • International travel. It is important to check the requirements of the country participants wish to travel to, which change frequently. Some countries recognise trial vaccines, or allow entry with swab tests, so there may be no need for an additional vaccine. On return to the UK, UK trial participants have already been given the equivalent status of travellers entering the UK who have received approved vaccines.
  • Documentation. The COVID Pass service will be further developed to display the additional approved vaccine doses for international travel. The service will show your additional approved vaccines two weeks after the full course of additional doses has been received. This development is underway and is expected to take a maximum of 10 weeks, which is how long it will take to receive the two additional vaccine doses. Updates will be shared on the Be Part of Research website.

  • Timing. In order to be recognised as vaccinated with approved vaccines, participants will generally need 2 doses, 8 weeks apart, with an additional 2 weeks after the second dose, before they are considered to have had an approved vaccine (likely to be a minimum of 10 weeks from the date of your first approved vaccine). We do not know if and when  trial vaccines such as Novavax will receive regulatory approval across the world, meaning it is possible further vaccination may be unnecessary by the time of your travel.

  • Clinical trial participation. Every participant makes an important contribution to the collection of data about the safety and effectiveness of trial vaccines. We are very grateful for your willingness to help and the time you have given to help identify effective vaccines. Some participants have expressed that they no longer wish to be involved, but if too many participants leave the trial early to receive approved vaccines, there may be a risk that there will not be enough data collected for authorisation, as well as important long term safety follow-up on participants. As a result, we would encourage as many participants to stay in the trial for as long as possible. You are of course free to withdraw from the trial at any time, for any reason, and we appreciate all the time you have given so far. Please just let the trial team know. For some trials, you may be able to stay in for follow-up and monitoring even after receiving additional approved vaccine(s).

If you want to have an additional vaccine to enable travel, please note that this has to be a personal decision made by you in discussion with a doctor who is part of the team supporting your trial, accepting the risks outlined above. You can request it from certain regional centres in England that have been working with the clinical trials. Please take this letter with you. 

Booking and receiving your additional vaccine

It is important that you have the opportunity to discuss whether you wish to have additional vaccines with a doctor who is familiar with your trial. This is so that they can talk through any benefits of additional vaccine against the risks, for your particular case. Please do not just arrive at any vaccine centre or try to book your appointment through the 119 system ahead of this.

Your trial site will be in contact with you, as soon as they are ready to offer you an appointment, should you wish to have an additional vaccine. The process of counselling participants who want travel top-ups and arranging for their vaccination will take some time and we ask for you patience as this is rolled out across all sites. We would ask that participants do not call or attend trial sites without an appointment unless they have an urgent concern. This is so that they can put arrangements in place, to support participants through this process. Thank you for your patience as this is offered to all participants as early as possible.

More details will be confirmed on the Be Part of Research webpage (bepartofresearch.nihr.ac.uk/Vaccine-studies/Latest-vaccine-news). 

Thank you again for your participation and the important contribution this has made and for your patience whilst this issue has been looked into. 

Participant Letter (England): Receiving boosters after trials of approved vaccines (Oxford AstraZeneca, Janssen)

Dear Vaccine Trial Participant,

Receiving boosters after trials of approved vaccines

Thank you again for your participation which has enabled such progress to be made in the development of effective vaccines against COVID-19.  The world owes you a debt of gratitude.

The Government’s expert committee, the Joint Committee on Vaccines and Immunisations (JCVI), has now recommended some people receive a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, at least 6 months after their initial course of vaccination, to ensure that protection is maintained through the winter months. People in the priority groups for this include health and social care staff, older people and people with certain medical conditions, as in the first roll-out of vaccination.

People who have taken part in a trial of a vaccine that is now approved (Oxford AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Janssen or Moderna, given in any combination) can now have a booster dose at any vaccine centre. If you are in a priority group (health and care workers, older people and people with certain medical conditions) you will be invited to receive a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the national roll-out. Some of you have previously had problems accessing a booster when offered. We are sorry for the inconvenience this has caused. This has now been clarified by the Department of Health and Social Care and the NHS. You may need to take this letter along to the vaccine clinic to show to the vaccinator, before you receive your booster. If you have a follow-up appointment on your trial, please tell the trial team when you had your booster at your next appointment.

Please contact your study team should you have any queries.

Whether or not you have a booster COVID-19 jab, we recommend that you have your annual flu jab in line with NHS guidance. Please see nhs.uk/fluvaccine for more information.

Thank you again for your participation and the important contribution this has made.

In Wales, all trial participants have been sent a letter explaining that they will receive an invitation for a booster vaccination automatically by their Health Board when they become eligible. For those who have received a vaccine that is not yet authorised by the MHRA and who wish to receive an additional vaccination course to facilitate travel, the letter advises them to contact their trial team to discuss options. Welsh vaccine study participants can view a written statement on the Welsh Government website.

Boosters

Who can get a booster?

Trial participants (who are not already on a booster trial) can be offered a booster, in line with their priority group (for example, health and social care workers, older people and people with certain medical conditions).

You may be offered a booster by your trial team as part of the clinical trial you are participating in. If you are not offered a trial booster,, it is recommended that you take up the offer of an approved booster when you are invited to by the NHS, your employer (for health and care staff) or the trial site.

You should not take up a booster if you are on a booster trial, such as Cov-Boost, AstraZeneca Beta Variant or Sanofi booster, or if you have already had a booster dose on your trial, unless your trial team contacts you to suggest this.

Why are additional vaccine doses being offered to trial participants?

We recognise that some trial participants have been unable to take advantage of some of the benefits offered to people who have received a full course of approved vaccine, particularly overseas travel. This is because each country sets their own requirements for entry, and we are aware that many do not recognise trial vaccines.

The UK government has been working tirelessly with international partners including the G7, G20, EU Commission and the WHO to get recognition for trial participants. However, there is currently no internationally agreed policy or consensus on treatment of trial participants despite the UK government’s efforts.

We want to do everything we can for clinical trial participants. As a result, in consultation with the JCVI and in partnership with Chief Investigators of the trials, we are making an offer to trial participants who wish to receive additional doses of approved vaccines, on top of the trial vaccines. This will make it easier for participants to travel overseas as they can prove they have been vaccinated with an MHRA authorised vaccine.

It is important to remember that you do not need a full course of additional vaccines at the moment for clinical reasons, this is for travel purposes only. There is still an expectation that the vaccines trialled in phase 3 studies in the UK will offer strong, long-lasting protection against COVID-19, even if they have not yet been approved.

Who can get an additional course of vaccine for travel purposes?

Clinical trial participants are eligible to receive an additional course of vaccination for travel purposes once they have had a complete course of trial vaccines. If a study is still active, the participant will need to withdraw from their study in order to take up a full additional course for travel purposes. 

An additional course of vaccine for travel purposes is only relevant for people taking part in the following trials: Novavax, Valneva and some participants on ComCov2. Participants in other trials are unlikely to be eligible for an additional course of vaccine for travel purposes, as they would already have a vaccinated status recognised by overseas countries.

What are the side effects of receiving an additional course of vaccine?

Side effects of having a booster after a full course of approved vaccine are generally mild and similar to initial vaccine doses, such as headache, pain at the injection site and mild fever. While booster doses have been approved for use after approved vaccines, there are as yet no studies confirming the safety of two additional doses, and no studies where the new, as-yet unapproved vaccines, have been used as the primary dose with two additional doses. Your trial doctor will be able to guide you through this before you have additional doses, so that you can discuss the risks and benefits.

Will I be invited in for a booster or do I have to make an appointment?

You will be invited for a discussion with a clinician on the trial. They may offer you a trial booster, if this is built into the study you are participating in, or advise on making an appointment for an approved booster at a vaccine centre linked with the trial team. If you were on a trial of a vaccine that has since been approved (such as AstraZeneca), you can access a booster from any vaccine centre when you are invited to do so, you do not need to speak to your trial team first.

I have received an invitation for a booster from the NHS. Can I accept this?

This will depend on whether you have been involved in a study in which the trial vaccine used has been approved, or is yet to be approved. 

If you have taken part in a trial of a vaccine now approved (Oxford AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Janssen or Moderna, given in any combination) you can now accept an invite from the NHS and have a booster dose at any vaccine centre. If you are in a priority group, you will be invited to receive a booster or third dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in the national roll-out. In England, you may need to take this letter along to the vaccine clinic to show to the vaccinator, before you receive your booster.

If you are involved in a study in which the trial vaccine has not yet been approved (Novavax, Valneva, Medicago), the process for boosters will vary in each nation. In England, boosters will be available from certain vaccination centres only, for the time being. Your trial site will be in contact with you, as soon as they are ready to offer you an appointment, should you wish to have an additional vaccine. The process will take some time and we ask for your patience as this is rolled out across all sites. We would ask that participants do not call or attend trial sites without an appointment unless they have an urgent concern. This is so that they can put arrangements in place, to support participants through this process. Thank you for your patience as this is offered to all participants as early as possible. In Wales, if you are in a priority group you will be sent an invitation automatically as part of the national roll-out. We encourage you to discuss options with your trial team, but this is not a requirement to obtain a booster.

What do I need to do to get an additional course of vaccine for travel purposes?

If you are a study participant in England, please wait for your trial site to contact you to offer you the opportunity to speak to a clinician about whether you would like to receive additional vaccines. If you are a participant in Wales, if you do wish to consider obtaining an additional course, please contact your trial team to arrange an appointment to discuss.

They will discuss the risks and benefits with you, and whether you want to continue. If you do, they will help you make an appointment with a suitable vaccination site.

Which sites can I get my additional course of vaccine for travel purposes?

In England, arrangements are being made to link clinical trial sites with suitable vaccination centres nearby, which will usually be hospital sites. Your trial site will inform you on this in due course. In Wales, any centre can provide this additional vaccination course.

How can I book an appointment for an additional course of vaccine for travel purposes?

Please wait for your trial site to contact you. We would be grateful if you could continue to be patient, as it will take sometime for all participants to be contacted and offered a discussion with a trial clinician about having additional vaccine doses.

I've tried to attend a vaccine centre for an additional vaccine, but they said I couldn't have one as I was on a trial. What should I do?

There are many vaccine sites operating across the country at the moment. However, in England, only certain vaccination centres staffed by doctors who have been briefed about the clinical trials will be able to offer you the vaccine at this present time. This is usually hospital clinics who are linked with a clinical trial site. The reason for this is that they are able to offer an additional layer of safety, documentation and monitoring for participants. In Wales, all centres have been briefed. As part of this process, vaccine sites are being advised of the importance of supporting trial participants.

If you were on a trial of a vaccine that has since been approved (such as AstraZeneca), you can access a booster from any vaccine centre when you are invited to do so, you do not need to speak to your trial team first. Please take this information with you to your appointment. It is however very important to inform the trial doctor if you do receive another vaccine as this will be carefully recorded in the trial record for your safety and for the trial data.

Can I get a booster and then additional top up vaccine at a later date?

Yes, having an approved booster (already and in future) would not stop you from having an additional top-up vaccine at a later date to support you to travel. You would need only one additional approved vaccine - so two doses of approved vaccine in total. You do not need a booster on top of a full additional course of vaccines at this time.

If you believe you may like an additional top-up vaccine, we do not recommend you take up the offer of an unapproved trial booster at this time (if offered) but that you opt for an approved booster campaign through the NHS.

How long after completing my trial will I have to wait before I can receive a booster dose?

In line with the wider booster programme, six months will be required between the final dose of a course of active vaccination and a booster dose. If you are offered a booster as part of a clinical trial, there may be a shorter interval.

How long will I have to wait in between the two doses of the MHRA approved vaccine?

If you choose to have a top-up course, the relevant dose interval will be 8 weeks. This is the standard approval that the JCVI has recommended.

Which additional vaccines will I receive? Will I get a choice?

Your trial investigator will inform you of which vaccine you should receive. This will generally be the Pfizer vaccine except to those on mixed dose trials (such as Com-Cov). On some trials, you may be offered the option of receiving a trial booster, for example on the Cov-Boost study.

When will I be able to get a vaccine? In England, why are Novavax volunteers being prioritised?

In England, whilst we are working on a solution for all Covid-19 vaccine clinical trial participants, Novavax volunteers represent both the greatest number of trial participants in the UK, and those who have been on a trial the longest. Many of these participants had their full course of vaccination in autumn 2020. As a result, in England, we are piloting the rollout of this programme for these individuals in the first instance.

What about the devolved nations?

Separate arrangements are being put in place for the devolved administrations.

COVID Pass

If I choose to have a course of top up vaccines, will I be able to access an NHS COVID Pass?

The COVID Pass service will be further developed to display the additional approved vaccine doses for international travel. This development is underway and is expected to take a maximum of 10 weeks, which is how long it will take to receive the two additional vaccine doses when including the international standard of 2 weeks of immunity.

How will the travel NHS COVID Pass show the additional course of vaccine? After one dose? After two doses?

After one dose

For clinical trial participants who receive two doses of the trial vaccine followed by one additional MHRA authorised vaccine, COVID Pass will display a mixed dose of vaccines - one dose of the clinical trial vaccine and one dose of the MHRA authorised vaccine.

If you are planning to travel between your 1st and 2nd dose of the deployed vaccine, you should confirm the entry requirements of the intended destination country using the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office travel advice website to confirm that your destination country accepts mixed doses, including a trial dose.

After two doses

For clinical trial participants who receive two doses of the trial vaccine followed by two additional deployed vaccines, your COVID Pass will show the full course of the deployed vaccine within five days after the second dose has been administered.

Many countries will only accept vaccinated travellers 14 days after the second dose has been administered - however, this time period can vary from country to country.

Anyone intending to travel internationally should confirm the entry requirements of their destination country using the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office travel advice website as requirements for vaccination can vary from country to country.

How long will it take for my additional vaccines to appear in my travel COVID Pass to allow me to travel?

NHS COVID Pass will show the full course of the deployed vaccine within five days after the second dose has been administered.

All international travellers should confirm the entry requirements of the intended destination country using the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office travel advice website - as requirements for testing and vaccination can vary from country to country.

I had a booster/vaccine previously, how will it show on my COVID Pass in future?

COVID Pass does not currently show booster vaccinations for trial participants or people who received deployed vaccines. If you receive a booster vaccine and then opt for a vaccine top up for travel purposes, a process is being developed to show the two MHRA authorised doses.

I am planning to travel to a country that currently accepts the Novavax vaccine (e.g. Greece). Should I go ahead and arrange for a Top-Up vaccine?

COVID Pass currently only shows the first and last vaccine doses administered.  If a trial participant has an additional deployed vaccine then their travel COVID Pass will be displayed as a pair of mixed vaccines. The service is working to address this.

In the short term, trial participants who are planning to travel to a country that accepts the Novavax vaccine can delay having a top-up vaccine until after they have travelled.

Will trial participants still be able to access a domestic COVID Pass after their additional vaccines?

All trial participants in England are able to access the domestic COVID Pass. Your trial site can tell you how your details can be added to the exemptions list so that you can download your NHS COVID Pass for domestic purposes.

I’ve already had additional vaccines (without disclosing my trial vaccines). How does this affect me?

We do not recommend you receive additional vaccines now. Please inform your trial team at your next appointment, or earlier if you have any clinical concerns, that you have had additional vaccines as this is vital information for your safety and for the trial data. 

If you are a participant in the Novavax trial and you received two further doses of a deployed vaccine, the COVID Pass will show your first and last dose received until the new functionality to display both MHRA approved doses has been deployed.  Once the changes have been made to COVID Pass, you will then see two doses of the MHRA approved vaccine in the Travel screen and the Novavax doses will no longer show.

In England, all doses received will be visible in the ‘Your Health’ section of the NHS App.

Once I am able to receive additional doses, how long will it take before I am able to access an NHS COVID Pass for international travel?

It will take at least 8 weeks for trial participants to receive the two additional doses. The second dose of the additional vaccine will be available within COVID Pass within five days from administration of the second dose.

Many countries will only accept vaccinated travellers 14 days after the second dose has been administered - however, this time period can vary from country to country.  Anyone intending to travel internationally should confirm the entry requirements of their destination country using the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office travel advice website - as requirements for vaccination can vary from country to country.

Frequently asked questions

I’m on a COVID vaccine trial, should I have a flu vaccine?

Yes, we encourage everyone to take up the offer of a flu vaccine as soon as it is offered to you.

I have incurred extra costs due to a lack of vaccine certificate. Can I reclaim them?

We are sorry that some participants have had difficulties with foreign travel plans and in some cases, have had to incur additional costs for PCR tests for example. However, we have no control over the entry requirements set by other countries. The NHS does not cover tests for people wishing to travel abroad.

In certain circumstances, for a small number of studies, you may be able to reclaim certain additional costs for PCR tests for travel from the trial organiser. Please check with your clinical trial site. The UK Government is taking steps to make sure that vaccine trial participants have equal status domestically to people who have had a deployed vaccine. They are also working with international organisations and other countries on their entry criteria.

I’m on a trial. Will I be able to demonstrate exemption from quarantine on return to England from an amber list country?

Yes. People who have been double-jabbed at least 14 days previously are expected to benefit from certain exemptions from quarantine when they return to England from an amber list country, from 19 July, the Government has announced. They will still need to pay for and take certain tests. Further details can be found on the Gov.uk website. People who have taken part in a trial and received a full course of trial vaccines will also benefit from this. This will be demonstrated through the NHS Covid Pass (on the NHS app) or an NHS Covid Pass letter, or similar documentation to demonstrate you were on a trial. Different rules are in place for Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. If you are taking part in a vaccine study at a Scottish site, you can find more information and advice on the NHS Inform website.

Approved COVID-19 vaccines

The Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford/AstraZeneca and Moderna vaccines are now being rolled out across the UK.

These developments are a tribute to the global efforts of the life sciences industry, researchers and volunteers, underlining the importance of this vaccine research. It is thanks to you and all those involved, that we have this encouraging news about vaccines.

It is important that clinical trials into a number of other COVID-19 vaccines continue. Different vaccines work in different ways and we still need to collect important information about which vaccines work best, and are best for different groups of people, and on exactly how effective they are at, for example, preventing severe infection, preventing infection as a whole, preventing transmission etc. We also need information on matters such as the best way to use vaccines, the number of doses, and to check long term that there are no safety concerns.

Keep taking part

It is really important that people keep taking part in all the COVID-19 studies, attend their follow-up appointments and submit data on their health and COVID-19 infections. We need volunteers to join new studies and existing studies are not yet complete, and we need the long term data to help us understand how best to use the vaccines, which are most effective and to give information on the levels of effectiveness, as well as reassurance on long term safety of them.

Here are some answers to questions you might have about what these developments mean for the clinical study you are taking part in.

Thank you for your continued interest in COVID-19 vaccine research.

Do we still need people to take part in COVID vaccine trials?

Yes, the trials will continue because we need data about a number of different vaccines and their safety and effectiveness, in order to protect the population.

We need several vaccines to ensure an adequate supply and because some vaccines may be easier to transport and store than others. We need further data on whether one or other vaccine is better suited to specific groups of people, such as older people or people with other medical conditions, and all the trials are giving information on safety, which is so important to gather.

Thank you for your participation - it is thanks to people taking part in trials that we now have approved vaccines.

Is it worth me joining a clinical trial now that we have approved vaccines?

It’s a personal choice but we believe it is. All the studies now recruiting will give you an active vaccine during the trial. Taking part in a study is the best way to help effective vaccines to be identified and made available to everyone earlier, and may even give you early access to a vaccine later found to be effective.

I’m on a clinical trial and not in a priority group for vaccination, what does this mean for me?

Please continue to take part in the clinical trials, attend for your follow-up booster (if applicable), and all your follow-up appointments. We are asking people to continue to take part in clinical research for as long as possible.

If you have further questions about vaccine studies please visit our frequently asked questions page or visit approved vaccine studies.

You can also find more information about other types of COVID-19 research.