Welcome to our new site.

BETA
The UK Clinical Trials Gateway has now been replaced with Be Part of Research. This is a new site which is still under development. Your feedback will help improve it.

Be part of research

We are here to help you find out about health and social care research that is taking place across the UK.

Real life stories

Jane

“I wholeheartedly support clinical research. I wouldn’t be here enjoying an active life if it wasn’t for health research.”

Jane Owen, retired physiotherapist and Patient Research Ambassador

Photo of Jane Own

Stephen

“Unless we try things out we’d never get to know what would work”.  

Stephen Burgess, rare cancer trial participant. 

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Harry

“Harry was well looked after, carefully monitored, and we felt supported by the staff every step of the way.”

Stephanie George and Lee Murdoch whose newborn son Harry took part in a study.  

Photo of Harry Murdoch in his mothers arms

Tell us what you think about this site

We’ve rebuilt the UK Clinical Trials Gateway to make it easier to use. We will continue to improve our new ‘Be Part of Research’ site but we need your help. Feedback now.

How to be involved

Online course: Improving healthcare through clinical research

A four week online course which is delivered free of charge, explains how medical treatments are discovered, tested and evaluated to improve healthcare for all. The next course starts from the 7 October 2019 and can be completed at your convenience. 


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Who benefits from clinical research?

In this video, Professor Allan Gaw talks about how we build our understanding of how research feeds into our healthcare system.  "Your role is crucial because every treatment that is given, every tablet that is prescribed and every test that is performed, has to first be discovered and then evaluated before it can be used".  


Latest news


Diet and physical activity interventions targeting children and youth have different, yet small, effects on preventing obesity

Obesity prevention interventions which include both diet and physical activity may reduce the risk of obesity in pre-school children. Once at school, physical activity appears to be more effective for weight loss than diet alone. Resulting weight loss form any intervention, if any, has been very small with unclear benefits to the individual or population. This NIHR-supported Cochrane systematic review pooled the results of 153 global randomised-control trials (six from the UK) aiming to prevent childhood obesity. Most interventions targeted individual children at school and lasted less than a year. Other similar systematic reviews have found modest or no effect from childhood obesity prevention interventions targeting individual behaviour change. As a result, Public Health England advocates a “whole system approach”. This targets the problem of expecting individual children to change their life-long habits without also addressing the powerful obesity-promoting environmental factors all around them.

NIHR Signals
Diet and physical activity interventions targeting children and youth have different, yet small, effects on preventing obesity

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation may be an option for patients with aortic stenosis at lower surgical risk

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the less-invasive procedure, may be associated with a reduced risk of death and stroke for up to two years when compared with surgical aortic valve replacement for adults with severe narrowing of the aortic valve, irrespective of the level of surgical risk. TAVI is already an established procedure for those unsuitable for surgery or at high risk. This meta-analysis evaluated seven trials comparing 8,020 adults treated with one of these procedures who had any level of surgical risk, including those at low surgical risk. At present, NICE guidance recognises the use of TAVI as a safe and effective method but outlines open heart surgery as the first line of treatment for those at low surgical risk. This review backs the idea of TAVI now being used in a wider group of patients; however, there is still a balance of risks to be considered that requires a discussion of patient preference.

NIHR Signals
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation may be an option for patients with aortic stenosis at lower surgical risk

More health research news